Journey on the Cowlitz

By The Chronicle & SeeSouthwestWA.com

Category: Cowlitz 2015 (Page 1 of 3)

Journey on the Cowlitz: The Complete Adventure

Published on July 11, 2015 and inserted into print editions of The Chronicle.

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First By Air, Then By Raft

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An Aerial Look at the Cowlitz River Precedes Journey

By The Chronicle

news.150528.cowlitz.aerials.upper.phc0727The Cowlitz River stretches from Mount Rainier National Park to the Columbia River.

Over approximately 105 miles, it winds through wilderness and pastures, communities and recreational areas.

news.150521.cowlitz.aerials.phc0393In preparation for The Chronicle’s Journey on the Cowlitz, Visuals Editor Pete Caster took two flights above the river.

The purpose was twofold.

The aerial endeavors allow us to gather current images of a river known for its ability to transform.… Read More

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Preparing for a Journey on the Cowlitz

By Eric Schwartz, Editor

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The sun was preparing to make its first appearance as I huddled under a shelter at Rainbow Falls State Park, straining my eyes to focus on my laptop screen as I attempted to harness mental waves of exhaustion and excitement. 

It was June 2009, and former Chronicle photographer Brandon Swanson and I were preparing to embark on a journey that would take us from the Doty and Dryad area all the way to Grays HarborRead More

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The View From Above: Scouting the Cowlitz River

Journey on the Cowlitz, The Chronicle, June 2, 2015 / TDC-150602-A008

Journey on the Cowlitz, The Chronicle, June 2, 2015 / TDC-150602-A008

The View from Above the Basin

news.150528.cowlitz.aerials.upper.phc0867From about 1,500 feet up, the cities of Lewis County look like toy villages built into the threadbare patches of an old scrunched-up shag rug. Descend any lower and humanity’s imprint becomes more real and you see how we’ve imposed a geometric order over the natural world. Trees, like green starburst sentinels, stand in checkerboard formations, often abutting sprawling green fields or housing developments at the edge of town.… Read More

Cowlitz River Hatchery Production Plan Sees Little Change

Attendees at a Cowlitz Fisheries Annual Project Review Meeting listen to officials from Tacoma Power and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife at Wednesday at Centralia College.

Attendees at a Cowlitz Fisheries Annual Project Review Meeting listen to officials from Tacoma Power and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife at Wednesday at Centralia College.

The number of hatchery salmon and steelhead released in the Cowlitz River isn’t going to change much from the implemented 2014 plan to the draft 2015 plan, officials said at a Wednesday night meeting in Centralia.

The most notable change is a 25,000 boost to summer-run steelhead released, increasing from 625,000 to 650,000 under the Fisheries and Hatchery Management Plan.… Read More

Clouds settle above the Nisqually River at Mount Rainier National Park on Tuesday, June 2, 2015.

Day 1: Glacial Views? The Picture Is Fuzzy

Heavy Clouds and Friendly Scientists Greet Cowlitz Explorers

Editor’s Note: Chronicle Reporter Dameon Pesanti and Visuals Editor Pete Caster have begun their trip down the Cowlitz River. They began on Mount Rainier Tuesday, and will finish at the Columbia River in the next two weeks. The duo plans to begin rafting Friday.

Runoff from the Nisqually Glacier trickles down the mountain side on Tuesday, June 6, 2015 at Mount Rainier National Park.

Runoff from the Nisqually Glacier trickles down the mountain side on Tuesday, June 6, 2015 at Mount Rainier National Park.

Not everything goes as planned, and sometimes that’s for the better.… Read More

Mount Rainier National Park Regional Geomorphologist Paul Kennard, center, stands in the basin near the Nisqually River while explaining how excess sediment has widened the river bed on Tuesday afternoon at the national park. The excess sediment has caused the river bed to rise drastically which damages trees along the sides of the river bed along with causing road damage to Route 706, the main road in the park that leads to Paradise.

Journey on the Cowlitz: Glacial Beginnings

Imagine prehistoric glaciers carving the land we call Lewis County almost like a child scraping a groove through a sandbox.

Roughly 35,000 years ago, long valley-filling glaciers extended from the Mount Rainier area into what is now Silver Creek near Mayfield Lake.

Mount Rainier National Park Regional Geomorphologist Paul Kennard, center, stands in the basin near the Nisqually River while explaining how excess sediment has widened the river bed on Tuesday afternoon at the national park. The excess sediment has caused the river bed to rise drastically which damages trees along the sides of the river bed along with causing road damage to Route 706, the main road in the park that leads to Paradise.

Mount Rainier National Park Regional Geomorphologist Paul Kennard, center, stands in the basin near the Nisqually River while explaining how excess sediment has widened the river bed on Tuesday afternoon at the national park.

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The Ohanapecosh River
Thursday, June 4, 2015

Early Reflections: Cowlitz Offers Stunning Scenery as River Journey Begins

Editor’s Note: Reporter Dameon Pesanti and Visuals Editor Pete Caster are traveling the entirety of the 105-mile Cowlitz River.

Day 2: The Wild Roots of the Cowlitz River

In this photo taken with a long exposure, water runs down a creek that feeds into the Ohanapecosh River Thursday, June 4, 2015

In this photo taken with a long exposure, water runs down a creek that feeds into the Ohanapecosh River
Thursday, June 4, 2015

As they say, the devil fools with the best laid plans. Pete and I planned on getting to the office early and finishing our work by noon to get to Mount Rainier National Park fast on Wednesday.Read More

The La Wis Wis Forest Service Station sits unoccupied while under restoration on Thursday morning at the La Wis Wis Campground five miles east of Packwood.

Public Invited to Learn About Historic La Wis Wis Guard Station East of Packwood

Volunteers Working on Restoring Station Beginning Monday

The La Wis Wis Forest Service Station sits unoccupied while under restoration on Thursday morning at the La Wis Wis Campground five miles east of Packwood.

The La Wis Wis Forest Service Station sits unoccupied while under restoration on Thursday morning at the La Wis Wis Campground five miles east of Packwood.

Volunteers at the La Wis Wis Campground east of Packwood will soon continue on-site work for a multi-year restoration project to the historic guard station at the recreation area.

While the opportunity to volunteer on the project has closed, interested people are invited to visit the 78-year-old guard station to witness the rehabilitation in person and celebrate the National Historic Preservation Act’s 50th anniversary.Read More

Buzzards gather on the shore of the Cowlitz River to feast on dead fish just south of U.S. Highway 12 between Packwood and Randle Sunday afternoon.

Journey on the Cowlitz: Sharp Logs, Big Bends and Hot Sun

Editor’s Note: Reporter Dameon Pesanti and Visuals Editor Pete Caster are traveling from the headwaters of the Cowlitz River to its confluence with the Columbia River in Longview. Follow their journey online at Cowlitz.SeesouthwestWa.com. They are also posting regularly to Twitter (@JourneyCowlitz) and Instagram (journey_on_the_cowlitz).

Friday-Saturday, June 5-6: A Long Day’s Float Followed a Campground So Sweet

Dameon Pesanti pulls the raft off of a gravel bar after a short lunch break Sunday afternoon while traveling on the Cowlitz River between Packwood and Randle.

Dameon Pesanti pulls the raft off of a gravel bar after a short lunch break Sunday afternoon while traveling on the Cowlitz River between Packwood and Randle.

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